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and the world of technology, as steve jobs steps down. >> suarez: we talk to "washington post" sports reporter sally jenkins about the diagnosis of alzheimer's disease for legendary basketball coach pat summitt. >> brown: from the "economist film project": we get the story of two elderly drivers, still behind the wheel. >> next month, i'll be 97. i've been driving for about 89 years. i think i'm beginning to learn how to do it now. >> suarez: and we have another in our interviews with republican presidential candidates. tonight, former utah governor jon hunstman. >> i believe that on some issues we've gone too far to the right. and i believe that we've got to be more common sense oriented. we've got to be focused on solutions. we've got to be a party of solutions and big ideas. that's how we're going to attract people, and that's ultimately how we're going to win elections. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> we pumped $21 million into local
, steve warned that if this devolves into revolutionary justice where there is a departure from dew due process t obviously this would be a stain on egypt's reputation, but i think what people in egypt may be afraid of is precisely the opposite, that the courts will get mired in due process and actually won't hold mubarak sufficiently accountable, either because of their kind of internal processes or because they've been directed by the military to not punish mubarak. so that i think is what people are worried about is they're worried that the court system may not punish mubarak as fully as people believe he needs to be punished. so there is this very delicate balancing act that has to happen. >> precisely what i mean by revolutionary justice and a desire for revenge, which you can understanding. this is why perhaps this trial in this way is not the best way of going about it. perhaps a truth in reconciliation commission, along the lines of what happened in south africa many years ago, may have been a better way to go. >> warner: because that would lay out all the abuse, how the secret
started his political career, very few people know this, his first boss what steve solarses a liberal democrat. but then moved on to a protege of alan simpson of the simpson bowles commission. not just bej director but trade commission so he know it. close with ben carden of the house. sow knows bipartisanship but he is a loyalist and he is a real key player. >> warner: now the house democrats, norm i will begin with you but maybe combine it. do we see any mavericks here? javier was era, james clyburn and chris van holden. >> all key people in the leadership close cho-- chosen by pelosi because of their persons, van holden is the ranking democrat on the budget committee at the talks. clyburn also at the talks. becara almost became trade representative. smart shall savvy pros, leaders, they're to the going to diverge very much from what pelosi wants or what the caucus wants but they've all indicated a willingness to cut a deal. >> warner: becera was on simpson bowles also. and yes, these are all people-- . >> warner: so he voted no. >> he voted no, you about he was there. and when it a
the bahamas and headed toward the u.s. mainland. and steve jobs resigned as chief executive of technology giant apple. jobs is a cancer survivor who's been on medical leave since january. in a statement he said he can no longer carry out his duties. on our website, find more from esmeralda santiago, as well as other stories. kwame holman explains. >> holman: the novelist reads from "conquistadora" on art beat. we have a photo essay from south dakota's black hills and more on the history of the native american land claim. plus read ray's blog post about somalis suffering from the famine and the political strife in mogadishu. that's on our global health page. all that and more is on our web site: newshour.pbs.org. ray? >> suarez: and that's the "newshour" for tonight. on thursday, we'll have a newsmaker interview with republican presidential hopeful and former utah governor jon huntsman. i'm ray suarez. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. we'll see you online and again here tomorrow evening. thank you and good night. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and the william and
has been in the city of manchester. we have a report from steve douglas of "independent television news." >> reporter: another night and another city consumed by rioting. this was a store ablaze in manchester's city center. it appeared to be started by a teenager moments earlier who calmly walked away. today an 18-year-old man was arrested on suspicion of arson. hours earlier, greater manchester police released images of those they're searching for on a night when they struggled to cope. here you can see a t.v. being looted from this shop. but with the possibility of violence, was it right to send 100 officers to help in london? >> we were prepared. we've done a huge amount of work during the day. we had a lot of officers on duty. we've already changed to 12-hour shifts so having even more officers on duty. >> reporter: the riots were worse here. here, cars and buildings burned. the police charged, but for large periods the streets didn't belong to them. lawlessness and looting prevailed. at the center was a shopping precinct-- on fire and under siege. >> it's just a bit sad. peopl
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)